Thursday

Lavender Apple Cake Recipe

I love this on cool evenings. It's doubly good with lavender ice cream.

Lavender Apple Cake Recipe

2 eggs
2 cups pealed and thinly sliced apples
11/4 cups lavender sugar
2/3 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 teaspoon vanilla

Combine flour, baking powder, salt and set aside. In a separate bowl, beat eggs with a whisk or blender until light and foamy. Add sugar to the eggs while stirring constantly. Add flour mixture a little at a time until completely blended. Add nuts and fold in apples.
Grease a baking pan and add mixture carefully. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

Lemon Lavender Glaze

½ stick of butter
1 cup sifted lavender confectioners' sugar (prepared as for lavender granulated sugar)
1 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Add sugar to softened butter and beat well. Add lemon juice and blend well. Spread on warm cake.

I will typically color a little granulated sugar lavender and sprinkle it on top of the glaze.

Special Note: The longer you let the lavender sugar mixture sit, the more flavorful it will be.

5 comments:

Hedgewitch said...

how wonderful!

I like to make lavender biscuits .. I'll post the recipe on my blog this summer

Can't wait to try out this recipe, too (and you have reminded me to make some lavender sugar this year.. many thanks!)

Sandra said...

Thank you for such good info on lavender!
I am interested in finding a lavender with foliage of very light grey to use as a hedging plant. Blossom color is not important. Any suggestions?
Knotfornot

Sara Elliott said...

Hi Sandra,

I've seen two lavenders with very silvery foliage. One was a Fred Boutin lavender and the other was called white Provence lavender. I don't own either of them myself, but they might be worth a look.

Hope this helps.

Sara

Anonymous said...

I'm searching for a lavender that grows well in central North Carolina. The name of it is something that sounds like "grocco".
Nancy~

Sara Elliott said...

You may be thinking of Grosso lavender. It grows well in North Carolina.